Advance praise for UNDER THE SKIN

24fb76e6-5d62-44ec-96bb-b351047b8df2Nick Hahn’s debut novel is a riveting exploration of friendship, race, and courage, told through the intersecting stories of two fascinating women caught in a storm of politics, intrigue, and spiritual struggle.  Skillfully written and tight as a drum, Under the Skin will leave you breathless.

 Mark Matousek

Author of Ethical Wisdom: The Search for a Moral Life, Mark is a multi-book published author, reviewer, and writing coach.

The book will launch Friday, August 2, 2013. Available on Amazon, Kindle, Barnes & Noble, Nook, Kobo, Apple iBook, and coming soon to your favorite bookstore.

Brian Klems, of Writer’s Digest with excellent input on copyright law.

WRITER’S DIGEST
WRITE BETTER, GET PUBLISHED
WD July 30, 2013

Writer’s Digest Home Page  :   Subscribe  :   Renew  :   Bookshop

Can You Copyright an Idea?

Q: I have a fantastic idea for a book. I’m unclear on copyright rules and I want to protect my idea from someone else copying it. What steps should a person take in order to protect an idea until it comes into print? -Brian
A: I hate to break the bad news, but you can’t copyright an idea. Nobody can. Section 102(b) of the Copyright Act specifically states: “In no case does copyright protection for an original work of authorship extend to any idea, procedure, process, system, method of operation, concept, principle or discovery, regardless of the form in which it is described, explained, illustrated or embodied in such work.

“So if copyright law doesn’t protect an idea, what exactly does it protect?

Copyrights cover “original works of authorship” that the author fixes in a tangible form (written on paper, typed on computer, scribbled by crayon on a napkin, etc.). In other words, it protects the specifics of your book after it’s written. No one can steal, reprint or profit from your work without your consent. Though, no matter how hard you try, you can’t safeguard the idea behind your story.

Think about it like this: No one directly copied William Shakespeare’sRomeo and Juliet word-for-word and slapped their name on it, but they have used his idea-a love story about two young people from rival families- over and over again. West Side Story fits the bill (two lovers from rival gangs). Even Disney’s High School Musical has the same plot (rival high school cliques).

Now before all you overachievers point out that Shakespeare’s work has out-lived its copyright protection and is now part of the public domain, remember this: both West Side Story and High School Musical are copyrighted, so no one can steal significant details from them. But, much like your idea, they can’t stop others from using the basic concept.

This topic (and more) can be found in one of my favorite On-Demand webinars. It’s called Legal Issues and Contract Basics: All Your Writing Questions Answered and it’s presented by the amazing Amy Cook, an attorney who specializes in intellectual property and publishing law issues. The information in this 90-minute webinar is worth its weight in gold. And, right now, it’s 30% OFF (as is our entire collection of On-Demand webinars ). Check it out.

 

Under The Skin, a novel by Nick Hahn, due August 2013

photoIt was halftime when I saw him. He was walking one of his ponies around the cool down track and talking to a striking blonde in skintight jodhpurs. They were fawn colored with brown suede inserts that accentuated her inner thighs. She wore tall black riding boots and a clingy white blouse unbuttoned to mid-chest, showing a hint of perspiration just above her small, perfectly shaped breasts. She didn’t wear a bra.

If ever a girl could intimidate me, this blonde could. She was stunning. I immediately smoothed out my dress and pushed back my tawny red hair. Why, I wondered, was I giving this man or his blonde friend a moment’s notice?

Due: August 2013

24fb76e6-5d62-44ec-96bb-b351047b8df2In Under the Skin, a brutal African dictator is challenged by two young women from different worlds: Maggie Kincaid, born to wealth and privilege in New York, and Nabby Kibugu, born to poverty and obscurity in the African bush. Their unlikely friendship sparks a fiery political drama with the potential to upend the leadership of a country and change the lives of millions.

Maggie is working as an intern for an American company in Uganda when she meets longtime pen pal Nabby. She becomes ensnarled in a clandestine political campaign to elect Nabby as the first female president of Uganda. The women risk everything as they take on a corrupt, abusive government. In a startling move, they decide to enlist the improbable help of a notorious warlord, and it’s anyone’s guess as to whether their dangerous gamble will pay off.

 

(BIO)

Nick Hahn started writing while a student at the University of Notre Dame. His travel diaries reflect fourteen years of working among indigenous peoples from Africa to Latin America, where he witnessed social and political unrest. He makes his home in rural eastern Connecticut near Long Island Sound, where he writes and narrates audiobooks. Under the Skin is his first novel.